Escape to Fargo Village

Escape to Fargo Village

Bursting with life and colour, Fargo Village has become known as Coventry’s creative paradise. With both indoor and outdoor spaces and a welcoming atmosphere, enrich your retail therapy experience with Fargo Village, located on Far Gosford Street.

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Designed for independent businesses, Fargo represents all things fun and creative. If you’re on an adventure to try something new, check out Bubble Boba, a milkshake and Bubble Tea store that specialising in flavours inspired by traditional Japanese, Chinese, and Taiwanese culture. With 1000 combinations featuring mini desserts, it will be difficut to settle on a personal favourite. For the curious new to Bubbe Bobba, there are free samples on the counter daily to inspire and tickle tastebuds. It’s goIMG_0584[1]od to know that Bubble Boba has Vegan, Vegetarian, and Gluten Free options for everyone to try.  If you’re thirsty for more, Bubble Boba is avaliable for delivery via Deliveroo, including both singular orders and party platter options.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Things That You’ll Undoubtedly Experience While Living in Halls

Things That You’ll Undoubtedly Experience While Living in Halls

Living in halls of residence can be a tricky situation. Thrown in with a bunch of complete strangers, your first day of University consists of both a whole lot of awkward small talk, or endless conversations bonding over alcohol. After a month in my new home, I am confident in saying it’s been a whirlwind of fun, mostly.

The summer before Uni starts was a hectic one. After venturing from store to store, I found through frantically shopping I had bought more than I needed, resulted in a pile of useless items accumulating in the corner of my room. If you’re anything like me, your digs will be decorated with the best of what IKEA can offer, but will it pass the comfy test?

With University being such a social experience, the sense of a community feel in halls is felt straight away. Making friends from every floor of your accommodation is easier than you think, and it’s not a rarity to find yourself bumping into someone you’ve met before at previous flat parties.

Treat your key card like your debit card. Unless the idea of spending a significant amount of money for a replacement card doesn’t scare you, keep your key card in a secure place. These pesky cards have a habit of going AWOL, so keep them somewhere you have the comfort in knowing it’s tightly zipped away. Having to snapchat your flatmate at 4am asking to be let in is not the best way to make friends.

Pulling your weight around keeping the kitchen area clean is so important in maintaining good relationships with your flatmates. There’s a simple solution to avoid petty arguments: agree on a fair cleaning schedule and keep to it, no matter how gruelling it can be.  In halls, everyone has a responsibility to keep the flat a home. Checking for post in the pigeon hole may prove as a chore for some, especially if you’re the person with the allocated key. This more than often means that mail often goes unnoticed. The grandparents would be heartbroken to find out you haven’t received their letter with a £25 Sainsbury’s voucher inside.

Curry night, fajita night, burger night… The list goes on! Flat meal nights are the perfect way to socialise, have fun, and learn some new cooking skills along the way. Additionally, the best part is that everyone saves a bit of cash in the process. While that student loan sits in your account shining in all it’s glory, budgeting quickly becomes a way of life as a student. As tempting as that confectionary or bakery aisle is, only buy what you know you will eat. Finding that stale forgotten packet of brownies at the back of your cupboard is never nice, so be cautious while shopping on an empty stomach.

Flatmates will quickly become like family. It’s not your duty to listen to everyone’s personal problems, however lending a helping hand or a shoulder to cry on never hurt anybody. A problem shared is a problem halved.

 

10 Things To Expect While Living at Halls

Living in halls of residence seems like an impossible situation. Thrown in with a bunch of complete strangers, your first day of University consists of either a whole lot of awkward small talk, or endless conversations bonding over alcohol. After a month in my new home, I am confident in saying it’s been a whirlwind of fun (for the most part).

1) Treat your key card like your debit card.

Unless the idea of spending a significant amount of money for a replacement card doesn’t scare you, keep your key card in a secure place. These pesky cards have a habit of going AWOL, so keep them somewhere you have the comfort in knowing it’s tightly zipped away. Having to snapchat your flatmate at 4am asking to be let in is not the best way to make friends.

2) Food shopping while hungry is always a no.

While that student loan sits in your account shining in all it’s glory, budgeting quickly becomes a way of life as a student. As tempting as that confectionary or bakery aisle is, only buy what you know you will eat. Finding that stale forgotten packet of brownies at the back of your cupboard is never nice.

3) Stick to a cleaning rota to avoid flatmate fall outs.

Pulling your weight around keeping the kitchen area clean is so important in maintaining good relationships with your flatmates. There’s a simple solution to avoid petty arguments: agree on a fair cleaning scheduele and keep to it, no matter how grueling it can be.

4) Be prepared for fire alarms

Hungover from last night? Your accomodation doesn’t care, and never will. You’ll find yourself half asleep grabbing the nearest item of clothing and running down those steps like your life depends on it. Good job they’re only drills.

5) You’ll make friends from every floor of your accomodation easier than you think.

You’ll sense the community feel of halls straight away. With flat parties being the norm, it’s not a rarity for you to find yourself bumping into someone you’ve met before at previous parties.

6) Mail often goes unnoticed

Checking for post in the pigeon hole may prove as a chore for some, especially if you’re the person with the allocated key. The grandparents would be heartbroken to find out you haven’t recieved their letter with a £25 Sainsburys voucher inside.

7) Flat meal nights are a blessing

Curry night, fajita night, burger night… The list goes on! Flat meal nights are the perfect way to socialise, have fun, and learn some new cooking skills along the way. Additionally, everyone saves a bit of cash in the process.

8) You’re either going to love your new bed, or feel further detatchment from your old bed.

It may be decorated with the best of what IKEA can offer, but will it pass the comfy test?

9) You’ll never be fully unpacked.

The summer before Uni starts is a hectic one. Venturing from store to store, you’ll find you’ve bought more than you need. Thus, a pile of useless items will permanently lay in the corner of your room somewhere. Or the wardrobe.

10) Flatmates quickly become like family.

It’s not your duty to listen to everyone’s personal problems, however lending a helping hand or a shoulder to cry on never hurt anybody. A problem shared is a problem halved.

 

Walk the Moon presents: What if Nothing

Walk the Moon presents: What if Nothing

If Walk the Moon’s Shut up and Dance didn’t get you up on your feet in 2014, then maybe their new album will.

Having a year to reconcile and reinvent themselves as a group, Walk the Moon have returned with the promise of an exciting, ever-enthusiastic new album, expected to arrive in November.

“We’ve had some beautiful and intense life experiences, and we needed to take the time to do those experiences justice, and put them into this music that we’ve been working so hard on.” Lead singer Nicholas Petricca says to Billboard. Petricca had been open with fans about his personal life, announcing the loss of his father due to a hard battle with Alzheimer’s disease in February of this year on social media. A huge thank you was given to fans for their support, and a new wave of determination was set into the band. The Cincinnati quartet have revealed the three main ingredients that fuelled this new album for it’s inspiration have been sexual exploration, love and grief.

With the release of One Foot in September, and Headphones in early October, fans are only anticipating as to what is next. It’s a risky business for a band to change it’s whole image, but Walk the Moon is confident that their transformation will still hold the same 80’s groove inspired anthems with uplifting messages, however with a twist. Although pop ballad Shut up and Dance meant major success for the band, it had also proven an identify problem for the group.

“We weren’t prepared for the success.” Said Petricca. “We were in this position where we had this awesome group of hardcore fans who know us and knew the album and then this new huge crowd of people who mostly knew just that song. To us, this [new album] is this awesome opportunity to re-establish ourselves and let people know we’re a rock & roll band.”

The tour, named ‘Press Restart’, (not to be confused with the album name, What If Nothing) is a big indication for what is on the cards. However, fans know and love that Walk the Moon is all about looking into the unknown and taking chances, and it’s hoped that this is a quality they’ve kept in the new album. The band will be touring in the UK from the 5th of April up until the 11th, visiting Manchester, Leeds, Birmingham, Bristol, Norwich and London. For more information about tickets, visit the official Walk The Moon Website.

Coventry: The Motored Heart of Britain’s Transport History

Coventry: The Motored Heart of Britain’s Transport History

Opened in 1980, Coventry’s Transport Museum features a generous collection of model exhibitions suited for the biggest vehicle enthusiasts and historians. From the Penny Farthing to the Pung’s fitch, the museum offers an insightful into the advancement of British transport as we know it.

Situated in Coventry’s city centre, the museum consists of over 670 exhibits, including commercial vehicles, motor cars, cycles, motorcycles, automobiles, books, photographs and visual storytelling. With the first donation dating back to 1937, the museum has grown in both popularity and size after it’s £7m redevelopment in recent years. Coventry’s transport museum provides the perfect educational trip for people of all ages to both learn and reflect on the staggering changes to the way we now live in regards to travelling.

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Pictured: Rover Car
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Pictured: Penny Farthing

Coventry’s transport museum offers an open-minded approach to Coventry’s history in its contribution to the motor industry from the Victorian era to the modern age. After spending over an hour in the museum, I was fascinated by the gripping details within the older exhibitions in comparison to now minimalistic inventions in present time.

A notable feature I had found in the museum was it’s impressive and engaging visual features,  such as its display of timelines pertaining to the history of Coventry’s founding inventions within the motor industry. Also included within the museum was information in regards to Coventry’s wartime efforts. As an individual with an interest in background history of cities as well as personal heritage, having a newfound perspective into Coventry’s past was deeply intriguing.

Thought provoking and purposeful, Coventry’s transport museum was both a worthwhile and positive experience and is a place in which I intend to visit again in the near future. If the history of Coventry does not capture your interest, the museum will guarantee to spark imagination with its futuristic exhibitions, holding interest to those particularly with an eye for technology and invention.

 

Child Labour: Can it be resolved?

Child Labour: Can it be resolved?

Child labour is a devastating issue that statistically is estimated at 200 million worldwide, most prevalant in countries suchlike Mexico, Uganda, Kenya and Colombia. Strenuous labour includes commercial farming, exporting and coffee bean picking. Hours are long, the pay is low, and most importantly, it is illegal. 

With technology and media enriching us with the knowledge to find out anything that is happening in the world,  it comes as no surprise to why so many are stunned to find that such a crucial global dilemma has not yet been solved. Child labour is a distressing issue, and one that many individuals turn a blind eye to.

Child labour is a huge prevention from happy childhoods, a right to education, and a healthy mind. One of the main factors as to why child labour continues to take place is because a good quality education can be difficult to maintain – resulting in lower chances of securing sustainable jobs in the future. The leading reason for lack of education is poverty. Families who are unable to provide for themselves are fully reliant on their children to generate an income; meaning finding time for their education is unattainable. This also means that children feel at an all-time-low with their aspirations – a life of working seems the only viable option.

It is common for child labourers to work in very poor conditions in unsuitable environments. Working conditions for the children are highly hazardous as machines often do not have safety devices, nor are there strict regulations. The labour is highly damaging to children both physically and emotionally, as they are exposed to heavy levels of stress, dangerous chemicals, and extreme temperatures. Pesticide poisoning, injuries from equipment, and intimidation are only a few examples of occurrences that happen during the practice of child labour.

To provide a solution to child labouring, it is in the hands of the law to make working under a certain age illegal. However, this has not been made possible, as most countries use child labourers in order to obtain the highest possible profit. These laws will also give reassurance to teenagers around the globe that they will be not working over the legal hours acceptable for their age group. Fortunately, there are ways in which the culture of child labour can be discontinued. By spreading awareness, spending wisely, researching companies and not supporting brands that use the practice, people are able to make significant changes to not only making child labour illegal, but by also strengthening workers rights around the world.